Blog

August 14th, 2014

iPad_Aug11_AApple prides itself on producing products and systems that simply work. This has proven to be a successful concept, as is evident with the sheer number of Apple products out there. The iPad, for example, is arguably the most popular, and useful, tablet with many business owners and managers owning one. These devices rely on apps but a common issue is that we often have so many apps it can be difficult to see what we have installed. Here are three ways you can figure out what apps you have installed on your iPad.

1. Finding installed apps via Settings

While there is no set section of the iPad's Settings that allows you to view installed apps, you can actually view installed apps by looking at the Usage section. This section tells users how much storage space installed apps are using, therefore giving you a list of installed apps.

You can access the Usage section of Settings by:

  1. Opening the Settings panel on your iPad.
  2. Tapping on General.
  3. Selecting Usage.
This will list the apps you have installed, organized by how much hard drive space they are using. What's great about this method is that you can not only see the apps you have installed but also see if there are apps you aren't using, or apps that are taking up valuable space. You can also select apps to learn more about how much memory they are using and even uninstall an app should you not need it anymore.

2. Finding installed apps via Spotlight

If you have iOS 7 on your iPad you can view all installed apps via the Spotlight feature. Spotlight allows you to search your iPad for files, folders, apps, and more, and can be accessed by swiping down from the top of the screen when looking at the Home screen.

You can see what apps you have installed using Spotlight by:

  1. Opening Spotlight by sliding down from the top of your iPad's screen.
  2. Tapping on the blank spot beside the magnifying glass.
  3. Typing "." (period/full stop) without the quotations.
You should see a list of your installed apps come up, though there is no apparent way they are organized. If you tap on an app name, it will open.

3. Finding installed apps via iTunes

The other way you can find out the apps you have installed is via iTunes. You can do this by:
  1. Plugging your iPad into your computer via the cord that came with the device.
  2. Opening iTunes, if it doesn't open automatically when you connect it.
  3. Clicking on the device's name under Devices.
  4. Selecting Apps.
You will be able to search for apps, or you should see a full list of installed apps. The great thing about this feature is that if you search for apps, you should see where they are on your device's screen. From there you can move the apps around, or even delete them.

If you are looking to learn more about using the iPad, please contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPad
August 13th, 2014

AndroidTablet_Aug11_AGoogle's mobile operating system Android has become one of the most popular systems installed on phones. While the system is feature heavy, many businesses are wary about the overall openness of the system. Earlier this year, Google announced the next version of Android - Android L - which will have a number of business-specific features called Android Work.

What exactly is Android Work?

Android Work is a program that is being developed by Google that will be introduced in the next version of Android - Android L. Because of the overall open and somewhat fragmented nature of Android, many businesses have been struggling to manage devices. In an effort to attract business customers, device manufactures have come up with their own business-centric suite of features that boost device security and manageability.

While there are a number of options out there, Samsung has had the most success with KNOX. This is essentially a secure version of Android that can be managed by businesses. With devices running KNOX, administrators can separate personal and work features, as well as manage and secure business apps and content on a user's device.

The best way to think of this program is that it enables a completely separate business profile, that can be managed by a company, on a personal device. Users with a system like this will be able to separate work and personal apps, content, and data, but still be able to use the same device. This is what mobile experts refer to as containerization - business apps and data are essentially stored in a container that is kept within the overall Android system.

Google found this idea of being able to separate personal lives and work on the same device to be something worth investing in, and have subsequently developed Android Work based on the KNOX platform. This will allow all Android users, not just users with Samsung devices, to take advantage of this program.

When launched there will be a number of key business oriented features beyond just the KNOX support. Here are two of the most talked about.

Seamless transition between personal and work data

Containerization is usually referred to as creating a separate system on one device, kind of like having a work and personal profile on your computer. While this is great, it can be annoying to switch between profiles on your device. So, Google has decided to modify the way containers work, making them more seamless.

With Android Work, IT will be able to install and manage apps on a user's device - they have to agree to this of course. Only, these apps will appear on the device beside personal apps and will be useable just like any other app. In the background however, the Android Work managed apps will sit in their own container. This container will apply heavy encryption to related data going in and out of the device, and restrict what users can do with the app (based on whatever rules the IT admin has set).

The key here is that while the apps and security are separate, the user will not notice any major difference and will be able to interact with both personal and business apps from the same profile. They will be able to tell the difference between work and personal apps as apps installed, managed or related to Android Work will have an identifying badge on the icon.

Easier deploying and managing of apps

With Android Work, IT admins or managers will be able to bulk purchase apps from the Google Play store and have them automatically installed on user's devices. If you use separate apps, or have developed apps for use in-house, you will also be able to push these to devices.

Beyond that, there will be admin panels that can push updates to apps on all devices, or even bulk manage existing apps. While the user will see no real difference, the apps in the Work container are managed by the administrator, not the user.

Will Work be useful?

Many business owners have been asking this question over the past few months, and the answer really depends on how you use devices in the office. If you support BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), you will be able to easily manage the apps, data, and security of just the business related apps, while still allowing personal apps and data to be installed on the same device.

Companies who provide their employees with mobile phones or tablets will also find Android Work useful as it will enable easier management and enhanced security across a variety of Android devices.

When will Android Work be available?

As of now, Android Work is still in development, but Google has noted that it will be released as a feature of the next version of Android, which is slated to be released this fall.

If you are looking to learn more about Android Work, or how to manage Android devices, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 13th, 2014

Offie_Aug11_AMost business users are familiar with using work applications like Microsoft Excel. While Excel creates charts and tables to make information easier to read, there’s a function that most users tend to forget, or are unaware of - headers and footers. So let’s see what they are and how adding them to your spreadsheet can help make your data even easier to read.

What are headers and footers?

As with Word, Headers and footers are lines of text that print at the top (header) and bottom (footer) of each page in an Excel spreadsheet. They often contain descriptive text such as titles, dates, or page numbers displayed in page layout views and on printed pages.

Headers and footers are useful in providing quick information about your document or data in a predictable format and also help set out different parts of a document. Simply put, they make calculations, graphs, and pivot tables much easier to read and follow.

How to add and remove headers and footers:

  1. Select the spreadsheet for which you want to add headers or footers.
  2. On the Insert tab in the Text group, click Header & Footer; this displays the spreadsheet in page layout view.
  3. To add a header or footer, click on the left, right or center of the Header or Footer text box at the top or bottom of the spreadsheet page.
  4. You can now add a preset header or footer to your document, or create a custom header and footer.
  5. To start a new line in a header or footer text box, press ENTER; to include a single ampersand (&) in the text of a header or footer, use two ampersands. When you are done, click anywhere in the spreadsheet to close Header or Footer.
  6. Return to Normal page view by clicking on the View tab and Normal button.
  7. To remove the header or footer from a spreadsheet, select the View tab and click on Page Layout. Delete the information you want to remove.
The next time you need to repeat text on a page to make information more organized and easier to digest, you can simply do so with Excel's header and footer feature. Looking to learn more about Microsoft Office and its features? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 12th, 2014

Office365_Aug11_AEarlier this year, Microsoft introduced Office for the iPad. These apps are touch-optimized versions of the popular Office programs. They enable users to access, edit, share, and create various Office files. From Excel to Powerpoint and Word, the major apps are all represented, and are fully featured if you have Office 365. In an effort to enhance the functionality of Office on the iPad, Microsoft has recently released a number of updates specifically for Excel and PowerPoint. There are also some changes that affect all apps. Here is an overview of the new updates.

Excel updates

There are three major updates that have been introduced to the iPad version of Excel:
  • Increased pivot table interaction - These tables are among the most useful for business users working with data. With the new update you can now filter, sort, collapse, and expand details. You can now also refresh pivot tables whereby data is pulled from the workbook. Beyond this, you can also change the visual style and layout of the tables.
  • Flick to select large amounts of data - Working with large amounts of data, or spreadsheets with a large number of rows and columns can be tough on the touch screen. So, to make things easier, you can now select large amounts of data by flicking. For example, if you want to select all the rows in one column, you can simply tap on the selection handle of the top row and flick down to select the whole column.
  • Easier manipulation of data - While touch screens are great, and useful, there are times when working with spreadsheets using a keyboard is much better. In the latest update, Microsoft has added increased support for keyboards. This includes support of many familiar keyboard shortcuts, like CTRL+2 which allows users to switch between cell entry modes.

PowerPoint updates

As with Excel, there are three updates that have been introduced to the iPad version of PowerPoint:
  • Presenter View - Many people had taken to using their iPad to run presentations while connected to a projector. In the previous version, your iPad would just show what was actually on the screen, but now you can enable Presenter View. This view shows your slide notes on your iPad's screen, as well as the slides that are coming up next while your presentation runs via the projector.
  • Easier inclusion of visuals - With the new update, all embedded videos and sound recordings now play natively over your iPad; meaning they will play directly from a presentation. You can also add media directly to a presentation from your iPad's Camera Roll, which means you can record and add content all from your iPad.
  • Better annotation tools - There are a number of new annotation tools, including an improved pen and eraser which are designed to make annotations on the iPad's touch screen show up on presentations more easily.

Updates across all apps

Microsoft has been listening to the feedback from Pad app users, and has introduced the three most requested features that apply to all three main apps: Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.
  • Send the file as a PDF - PDFs are one of the most versatile document formats for businesses. Because most systems have software to open these document, it's great for users who don't use Office. Now, you can send the document you are working on as a PDF directly from your iPad. You can find this option under the Share menu.
  • Better image editing - With the update, you can now tap on an image in any Office app to either crop or resize it. If you make any edits, and find they aren't to your liking, there is also the ability to revert to the original image by pressing Reset.
  • Support for third-party fonts - Some businesses prefer to use fonts that aren't included in Office. Up until now, only Office supported fonts could be used on the iPad, but the recent update implements support for third-party fonts (fonts not made by Microsoft) installed on your iPad.
If you are looking to learn more about Office 365 and iPad apps, contact us today to see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 6th, 2014

BCP_Aug05_AMany businesses are constantly facing a potential disaster. It could be a major fire that wipes out your business, or something as simple as accidentally deleting an important spreadsheet. Regardless of the severity of the potential disaster, businesses need to be prepared and one of the best ways to prepare is to back up your data. In the first part of this article we covered four tips that can help. In this article, we take a look at the next four tips to help ensure your data is backed up.

5. Automate your backup

It can be tough to actually remember to back up your files, especially if your business is busy. Therefore, you could look into an automated backup solution. At the very least, you should set a schedule as to when backups are conducted and set what is being backed up. While this isn't a full automation, a schedule will help.

If you are using solutions like the cloud or NAS (Network Attached Storage), you can usually automate the process by selecting which files and folders to back up and when. The software that powers these solutions will then do this automatically.

Ideally, your backups should be carried out automatically to ensure your data is available should you need it. But you should check periodically to ensure that your data is actually being backed up. This is especially true if you are backing up other systems, as there have been cases where employees have become frustrated by the backup process and simply turned it off. The business owner, thinking their data was being backed up would be in for a bit of a shock when systems crashed, if this was the case.

6. Back up your backups

Redundancy of your backups is just as important as actually backing up your data. You should keep a backup of your backup in case something happens to your original backup. While this doesn't have to be carried out as often as the 'normal' backup, this should be done on a regular basis.

In order to really ensure backup redundancy we recommend that if your main backup is kept on-site, then the secondary backup should be on another storage medium that is kept off-site.

7. Don't forget data stored on non-physical drives

What we are referring to here is the data stored on different services like your email, social media, and non-physical locations. This is especially true if you say have you own servers. It's highly likely that there is data stored on these services as well, and should they go down and you haven't kept a backup, you may lose important information.

Essentially, think about critical data that is used in the company, but isn't physically kept on computers. It may feel like this is going a step too far with backups, especially for businesses who use email services like Exchange and Gmail. However, while the chances of these systems going down are incredibly rare, it could still happen. Therefore, you should conduct a monthly to bi-yearly backup just to ensure that data is there somewhere should something happen.

8. Test your backups

Finally, it is beneficial to actually test your backups from time-to-time to ensure that they are not only working but the data is actually recoverable. If you do a trial run on recovering your data, you can get a good idea of how long it will take to retrieve this information when you actually need to recover it. You can then take steps to optimize this and let the relevant people know.

Also, testing is a good way to discover any problems, e.g., if someone has disabled backups, or one solution isn't working. This will ensure that your data is there when you need it.

If you are looking to integrate a data backup solution, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 5th, 2014

HealthIT_Aug05_AAs we move toward the October 2015 compliance deadline for ICD-10, the Journal of AHIMA has tackled three misconceptions about the new coding system.

ICD-9 isn't so bad. In reality, ICD-9 is obsolete, and the longer it is in use, the more the quality of health-care data will decline, leading to faulty decisions based on inaccurate or imprecise data. This could lead to increased operating costs along with mistakes which could have a negative effect on your practice and overall billings.

More codes create confusion and difficulty. Almost half of the new codes reflect the ability to differentiate one side of a patient's body from the other. Moreover, more codes, which are more precise, will in fact make it easier to find the right code. It's true that it will take time to learn the new codes, but in the long-run you should see overall efficiency increase, along with more accurate medical records which will make your job easier.

We could just use SNOMED CT or move right to ICD-11. Terminologies such as SNOMED and classification systems such as ICD-10 different roles—albeit complementary ones. And, ICD-11 won’t be ready for prime time until 2017, and that dates marks the beginning, not the end, of the process toward adoption. Remember, ICD-10 was first used by World Health Organization members 1994—and 10 year’s later it’s just going live on a widespread basis.

If you would like to learn more about ICD-10 and how you can ensure that your practice is ready for the October 2015 deadline, contact us today to learn how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 5th, 2014

GeneralHealthIT_Aug05_AThe Department of Health and Human Services has set the final deadline for health-care organizations to transition to ICD-10, and it’s just 14 months away—on October 1, 2015.

ICD-10 is designed to provide better patient care, disease management, and quality measurement—especially for patients under the care of multiple providers.

It replaces ICD-9, whose limited structural design lacks the flexibility to keep pace with changes in medical practice and technology. The longer ICD-9-CM is in use, the more the quality of health-care data will decline, leading to faulty decisions based on inaccurate or imprecise data, according to the Journal of AHIMA.

Originally, the deadline for ICD-10 Compliance was October 1, 2014, and health-care organizations worked feverishly to prepare for it. But then came the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, which called for delaying ICD-10 implementation. That threw countless health-care organizations back into flux.

Now it’s final, and health-care organizations have necessary certainty to move forward with their implementation processes, including testing and training. How will you use the extra time?

If you are looking to upgrade your systems to ICD-10, or to ensure your practice is ready, contact us today to learn more about how our solutions can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 31st, 2014

AndroidPhone_July28_AIn many countries when you go to buy a mobile phone, and more specifically an Android phone, from a carrier the mobile carrier will often install their own apps onto the device. These apps, commonly referred to as bloatware, are usually tied into a service that your carrier offers and are for the most part ignored by most users. The problem is, the majority of users don't really want these apps but when they try uninstalling them they often quickly find that they cannot. However, there is something you can do about this issue.

Bloatware defined

Read Android themed blogs and you will eventually come across this term. When it is used to refer to mobile phones, bloatware is software that has been installed by carriers or device manufacturers. These apps are generally useless, unwanted, or are value-added apps - meaning apps which you need to pay extra for in order to use e.g., a music service run by your carrier.

The kicker with bloatware is that you don't get a choice as to whether or not it is installed on your phone. The reason for this is because carriers and manufacturers install the apps before you purchase the phone. Many carriers have contracts with manufacturers to actually install the software before the device leaves the factory.

Is bloatware bad?

Mobile bloatware often gets a bad rap, especially because much of it is unwanted by users. That doesn't mean the apps are 'bad', or malicious. In fact, some users do actually use the software that comes installed by mobile carriers. The issue many have is that they have had no say in the matter and as a result feel forced into using certain apps, when they would rather be using something else, or would never have downloaded these apps in the first place.

In short, the vast majority of bloatware is not overly useful but it is by no means malicious. It's really more of an annoyance to many users.

Can I get rid of bloatware?

The short answer to this question is: No, you usually can't get rid of bloatware. Some of it can be uninstalled, but most of the apps installed by the carrier or manufacturer aren't able to be deleted.

That being said, there are two options you can consider:

1. Disable bloatware on your device

While you usually can't uninstall bloatware, phones running Android 4.X and newer do have the option of disabling it.
  1. Open your device's Settings panel. This is usually done by sliding down from the top of the screen and selecting the person icon with five squares followed by Settings.
  2. Tap on Apps and swiping right so All is highlighted at the top.
  3. Scroll to the app you would like to disable and tap on it.
  4. Press Disable.
  5. Tap Ok in the warning that opens.
  6. Once you do this, the app will be removed from the home screen and will no longer run in the background.

2. Purchase devices without bloatware

If you are currently looking for a new device, or are looking to upgrade your current phone, an option would be to purchase a device that doesn't have bloatware. For example, most phones you purchase separately from your carrier won't have carrier specific bloatware. Take for example Nexus devices. These phones, when bought outright, only have stock Google apps like Calendar, Gmail, Chrome, and Google Play store installed. Of course, if you buy the device from your carrier, there is a good chance it will have the apps on them. So it is best to look at the big-box stores or retailers.

If you are unsure as to whether the device you are looking at has bloatware installed, try asking the salesperson or looking at online reviews. As a general rule of thumb: If you buy the device from a carrier, or on a contract, the device will have some bloatware on it - most carriers have a stipulation on the agreement you sign giving them permission to install it, or noting that it is installed. When you sign the contract you thereby agree to have the apps on your device.

The major downside to buying devices like this for some users is that you have to pay full price for the device. For some this is worth it, while others are ok with the odd bit of bloatware if they get to pay less for their device.

Looking to learn more about Android phones? Contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

July 30th, 2014

SocialMedia_July28_AOne of the main ideas behind LinkedIn is that the network is a virtual venue for people to share their thoughts, ideas, and observances with other like-minded users. Earlier this year the company introduced a new feature to their platform that allowed a select few users to create blog posts directly on LinkedIn. Now, the company has decided to open this up to all LinkedIn members.

About LinkedIn's new publishing platform

Like other social networks, LinkedIn allows users to publish posts on their profile which are then visible to other users. In the past, there was a limit as to how long the posts could be, which influenced how users shared the content they generated. Most would simply copy and paste a link to their content into a post on their LinkedIn profile.

In an effort to make sharing thoughts, ideas, expertise, etc. easier, LinkedIn has implemented the long-form post. This feature allows you to create longer content, such as blog articles and opinion pieces, and post this directly on LinkedIn. In other words, you can now use LinkedIn as a blog which is shared with your connections.

If you create long-form content, this could be a useful way to get posts out to an even wider audience than through your blog. This is because when you publish a post on LinkedIn, it becomes part of your overall profile, with the post being visible under the Posts section of your profile. New long-form posts will also be published and shared with all of your contacts automatically.

This means that you could technically increase the overall reach of your content, especially if the content you produce is useful to your LinkedIn connections.

Writing long-form content on LinkedIn

If you would like to start publishing long-form content using your LinkedIn profile, you should be able to do so by:
  1. Logging into your LinkedIn profile.
  2. Pressing the pencil in the box that says Share an update…
Note: This update is still rolling out to users, so you may not be able to produce long-form content just yet. If you don't see the pencil in the Share an update… box, you will need to wait for a few weeks, or until you get an email from LinkedIn saying the feature is ready for you to use.

If you do see the pencil icon, click on it to open the long-form post screen. It looks like most other Web-based publishing and writing platforms with the usual formatting buttons and text field where you input the content.

You can write your article directly on this page, but many choose to write using a program they are comfortable with and then copy and paste into the text field. If you want to add images to your post, you can simply click where you would like the image to slot into the content and select the camera icon from the menu bar above the text field. Select the image and hit Submit. You can then resize the image by clicking and dragging on it.

Saving and editing your content

Once you have finished writing we strongly recommend you hit the Save button at the bottom of the text field. This will save the content to your profile, but will not post it. This means you can edit the content before publishing. To do this, click on Preview which will open your post in another window, allowing you to see what the post will look like on your profile.

While in Preview mode, be sure to check the spelling and grammar, along with the overall formatting. If you spot anything that needs to be changed simply switch back to the editing tab on your browser and make any amendments.

When you have finished writing, formatting, and editing you can then hit the Publish button. This will then publish the content on your profile and share it with your connections.

If you have content that you think your connections and colleagues would benefit from reading, then this new LinkedIn feature could prove to be useful and should be considered as a larger part of your overall content strategy.

Looking to learn more about LinkedIn and how you can leverage it in your business? Contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
July 29th, 2014

Office365_July28_AOffice 365 is undeniably one of the most efficient and versatile business Web apps available. With continuous updates and integration with Microsoft apps, Office 365 has recently made using Yammer a little easier by simplifying its login process. And if you are not too familiar with Yammer it might be a good opportunity to learn more and get an idea of this this simplified login could work to benefit your business.

What is Yammer?

Yammer is Microsoft’s social network platform, focusing on your business and your organization’s clientele. In order to join, you must have a working email address from your company’s domain, which will also enable you to create external networks to allow non-employees like suppliers and customers to communicate with your company effectively and easily.

What is simplified login and how do I turn it on?

Simplified login integrates Yammer and Office 365 through user mapping to save you time when signing into Yammer via Office 365. Here’s how to turn on the simplified login feature:
  1. Administrators must sign into Office 365 using the global administrator account.
  2. Select Admin, Sharepoint; and once in Sharepoint admin center, select Settings.
  3. On the Settings page, under Enterprise Social Collaboration, select Use Yammer.com service.
  4. Click on Yammer from Office 365 to check that you won’t have to log in again and can start connecting with people right away.
If you previously made Yammer the primary social experience for your organization, you can enable this for your Office 365 users by following these steps:
  1. Access Sharepoint admin center and select Settings.
  2. Under Enterprise Social Collaboration, click the Use Sharepoint Newsfeed button to clear previous settings
  3. Select Use Yammer.com service and click Ok to apply changes. Each of these two updates might take up to 30 minutes to complete
  4. Once you’re done, Yammer will replace Newsfeed in the Office 365 navigation.
Keep in mind that users without existing Yammer accounts are taken to a streamlined signup and verification process. And although user mapping saves time, it’s not a complete single sign-on solution, meaning when you go to Yammer.com directly or use Yammer mobile apps, you still need to log in with your Yammer.com credentials. Looking to learn more about Office 365 and its functions? Call us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.